Archives: Resources

Maine Chefs

Shawn Wilcox (left), executive sous-chef with the University of Maine Black Bear Dining; Rich Hanson, chef and owner (with his wife, Cary) of Cleonice Mediterranean Bistro in Ellsworth; and Cheryl Wixson, a chef who runs the nonprofit Cheryl Wixson’s Kitchen and who is an organic marketing consultant for MOFGA. English photo. Three chefs discussed marketing

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Canning

A Brief History of Canning Canning is only about 200 years old. It began when Parisian Nicolas Appert set out, in 1795, to win a reward from Napoleon Bonaparte for preserving food by vacuum-packing. By 1804, he’d learned to boil meat and vegetables in jars, seal them with corks and tar, and soon opened the

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Cilantro

Cilantro and coriander, from Koehler’s Medicinal-Plants, 1887. by Roberta Bailey Cilantro is an herb that arouses extreme passions. People either love it or hate it. It has a pungent, parsley-citrus flavor and aroma that makes people salivate with anticipation or completely avoid the dish that contains it. Cilantro is the leaf and coriander is the

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Grain

Maine Grass Farmers Network Offers Shared-Use Equipment The Maine Grass Farmers Network (MGFN), a cooperative effort of University of Maine Cooperative Extension and MOFGA, has received funds to purchase machinery for shared use by Maine farmers to improve nutrient management, pasture productivity and overall performance of grazing animals. This equipment will be available for MGFN

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Carrot Rust Fly

The larva of the carrot rust fly is a maggot that tunnels into carrots.  Photos by Eric Sideman. by Eric Sideman, Ph.D. I have lived in the same house in Greene, Maine, for over 20 years, and the carrot rust fly has been a problem only one of those years. But it was awful that

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LIF February 2008

  The logging crew at MOFGA’s Common Ground Education Center, Feb. 2008. Photo by Nick Zanstra. by Pete Hagerty and Sam Brown A Little History “We had a lot of fun, made a pile of wood, and didn’t nobody get hurt. Now, pay attention because it gets complicated for a while before it gets plain.”

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Palm Oil

Eustaquio Polo Rivera (shown here with interpreter Rocio Orantes) is vice president of the board of the Major Council, an organization of 21 communities that owns 42,700 hectares in the Curvaradó river basin in Chocó, Colombia.  He is an active leader in his community’s efforts to recuperate collectively titled lands that have been occupied since

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Wendy Holm

Canadian agrologist Wendy Holm takes farmers, chefs and students on working tours of Cuba, where they help establish research plots in sustainable dairy production, learn about local foods and food preparation, enjoy Cuban culture, and more. Photo courtesy of Wendy Holm. Wendy Holm of Vancouver, B.C., has, for 34 years, been an agrologist (a professional

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Grafting Tomatoes

Trees and other perennials are often grafted, but is it worth the time and labor to graft annuals? Cary Rivard is trying find that out with his Southern SARE Graduate Student project under the direction of Frank Louws at North Carolina State University (NCSU). Other members of the team include NCSU’s Mary Peet and Suzanne

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Licensing the Home Food Processor Kitchen

 Cheryl Wixson in MOFGA’s kitchen. English photo. Note: Some of the information in this 2008 article is out of date. For updated information, please see University of Maine Cooperative Extension Bulletin #3101, Recipe to Market: How to Start a Specialty Food Business in Maine, by Extension food science specialist and associate professor Beth Calder and

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