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Cost of Carelessness in the Woodlot

Heavy damage done to a red oak during harvest (conducted by a different owner). The entire butt log is ruined, and decay likely extends higher than shown here. 1988 Tree Farmer C5D – a mid-sized cable skidder The pine tree discussed here, eight months after being damaged. By Noah Gleason-Hart Photos by the author Low-impact forestry’s guiding

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American Beech

  A beech tree severely affected by beech bark disease. Postharvest view of a gap created during winter 2020 firewood cutting. Slash has been cut small and will decompose over the next few years; think of it as fertilizer for the next generation of trees. First flush of shiitake mushrooms on beech logs after a spring rain

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Tend to browntail moth webs now

  Browntail moths. English photo March 1, 2020 If you find browntail moth webs within reach, clip them by mid-April and destroy the webs by soaking them in soapy water or burning them. Winter is the best time to clip webs due to the low risk of exposure to the caterpillars’ toxic hairs, due to caterpillar dormancy,

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Recycle Your Greenhouse Plastic

By David McDaniel Rick Kersbergen, Paul Gallione and Sam MacDonald remove plastic from a greenhouse at Moosehead Trail Farm in Waldo. Thanks to a new program, they’ll be able to recycle the plastic. Photo by David McDaniel. Beginning in the spring of 2020, farmers and gardeners will be able to recycle their waste greenhouse and

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Cranberries Dont Assume You Cant Grow Them

  Many Maine farms and homesteads have low spots where cranberries will do well.   Cranberries ready for harvest By Will Bonsall Most folks think of cranberries as a crop with requirements that are too challenging for their situation. Cranberries like sandy, acidic, soggy peat soils that can be flooded at will, whereas the average

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Calendula Beautiful and Useful

  Calendula offers season-long blooms for pollinators, and its flowers are edible and medicinal. Photo by Mary McAvoy By Joyce White There are so many reasons to plant a big bed of calendula, Calendula officinalis. It blooms until frost for cut flowers and medicine, it isn’t fussy about where it’s planted, pollinators like it, it

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Why Grow Cannabis At Home

Figure 1 – If you want lots of flowers, train your plant by cutting off lower branches that receive little sun (lollypopping). Figure 2 – Female flowers emerging Figure 3 – A plant that is ready to harvest. Figure 4 – Larger flowers retain water, creating conditions for botrytis (gray mold or bud rot) to

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Harvest Kitchen What to Do With That Bounty of Food You Grew

By Roberta Bailey Many magazine or periodical journalists write their pieces for the readers of the future. With my Harvest Kitchen column, for example, I write in April for the summer issue of The MOF&G. Normally I don’t know in April whether summer will turn out to have been dry or whether we will have

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Using Cured Cannabis Flower

Figure 1 – Weighing flower for decarboxylation. Note the 62% moisture packet in the bell jar container, and tart cherry concentrate. Figure 2 – Molds ready to receive gummy mixture.  Note the eye dropper with the mixture. Figure 3 – Cooking gummy mixtures By John Jemison University of Maine Cooperative Extension Soil and Water Quality

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MOFGA Certification Services Hemp Update

Toki Oshima illustration By Chris Grigsby The year 2019 was certainly a whirlwind in the world of hemp production in the United States. MOFGA Certification Services (MCS) has been working hard to relay information to growers, submit comments and testimony on proposed rules, and prepare our organic certification program to accept applications from hemp growers.

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