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Simply Grande

Toki Oshima drawing By Roberta Bailey I have such gratitude toward Jean Ann Pollard. She has been a guide and inspiration to me in the kitchen since 1987, when she published The New Maine Cooking. Until then, I would go to the garden or the root cellar, choose vegetables for the day, then thumb through

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Foot Mouth

The Ecologist Provides Overview of “Slash and Burn” Control in the UK By Diane Schivera Foot and Mouth Disease (FMD) has other common names: hoof and mouth disease, aftosa (other diseases with similar symptoms use this name) and apthous fever. It is an acute, highly contagious disease caused by one of the smallest, filterable viruses

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Wheat

Jim Amaral of Borealis Breads. Leavening the “Taste of Maine” Experience By Jean English Jim Amaral and his wife, Dolores Carbonneau, started Borealis Breads in 1993 in Waldoboro. What began as a “Mom and Pop” operation, with 12 breads and about 12 wholesale accounts, quickly grew, so that by 1995 Amaral had bought a bakery

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Make Your Own GE-Free Breads

With the abundance of genetically engineered canola, corn and soy ingredients in processed foods sold at supermarkets, baking your own is often the only way to enjoy GE-free breads. Pam Bell photo. By Roberta Bailey Bread is elemental. It takes earth, water, air and fire to make it. Bread is basic, a one syllable word

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Garden Herbs

By Sue Smith-Heavenrich As a Girl Scout, I spent one Saturday morning every summer month weeding and pruning a formal herb garden. I decided, right then, that herbs required more care than they were worth and vowed I would never grow them. Ever. They’re a waste of time, I tell my husband as I tuck

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Gentle Gardening

Jean English photo. By Sue Smith-Heavenrich Every summer I put in a garden: a patchwork of red and green lettuces, the traditional trio of corn-beans-squash, a splash of cosmos and bachelor buttons. Our garden puts food on the table, I tell my husband when I ask him to till up just one more weedy patch.

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Lettuce Seed

By Nicolas Lindholm Supported primarily through a grant from the Maine Dept. of Agriculture, this is the third of five articles covering some of the most com­monly produced and potentially profitable seed crops being grown by small-scale organic and biodynamic farmers in the Northeast. As co-founder and Executive Director of the Maine Seed Saving Network,

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Raspberries

By Jean English Tom Hoerth of Bath ate a handful of raspberries, “big, full, really nice berries.” Locally grown berries … Maine berries … on the 27th of March this year! Hoerth says that he still has to pinch himself to believe that he has 1800 raspberry plants going in his greenhouse, located in Wiscasset,

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Buckwheat

By Jean English Keeping a vegetable garden is like keeping a family: Both need continuous care and nourishment if you want them to thrive. In the case of the garden, that means keeping up the weeding and/or mulching now, and keeping bare spots planted. If you’ve planted all of the lettuce, spinach, carrots and other

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Tomatoes

By Eric Sideman, Ph.D., Director of Technical Services, MOFGA Tunnels and greenhouses are now being used widely to produce early and often blemish free tomatoes. However, high humidity is difficult to avoid under plastic, and it creates an ideal environment for fungal diseases that can spread very quickly and cause widespread damage. Two common diseases

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