Archives: Resources

Blueberries

(or Why We’re Wild about Blueberries) This moderately-priced, three-piece, stainless steel steamer-juicer enables the authors to make and then freeze at least 30 quarts per year of wonderful, no-fuss blueberry juice without the need for straining. Photo by the authors. by Lee Ann Ward and Larry Lack © 2005. For information about reproducing this article,

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Good Life

Writer, professor and homesteader Linda Tatelbaum amid the beauty and bounty of her garden, harvesting tomatoes growing in the south-facing, luxuriant hillside garden she and her husband, Kal Winer, have created in Burkettville, Maine. Every year she cans 300 quarts of vegetables and fruits for good winter eating. by Jean Ann Pollard © 2005. For

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Photographer

By Judith Perry Laurie Tümer, a photographer who teaches digital imaging, writing and photography, lives and works in New Mexico and is represented by Photo-Eye Gallery in Santa Fe. For more about her work, visit www.photoeye.com/ and www.laurietumer.com. Tümer’s images, inspired by the research of Dr. Richard Fenske, provide a picture of the ubiquitous presence

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Predator Friendly Farming

These foxes are residents at Becky Weed’s Thirteen Mile Ranch in Belgrade, Montana. Photo courtesy of Becky Weed. By Tim King Coyotes, fox, raccoons, hawks, owls and, in some places, wolves, cougars and bear can make strong farmers weep. Coons in the chicken coop or coyotes in the new lamb crop can bring tears to

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Raspberries: Challenging But Profitable

by Jean English Growing raspberries in high tunnels can extend the growing season by several weeks, increasing yields and profits (and labor requirements) and enabling growers to raise varieties that aren’t winter hardy otherwise. Photo courtesy of Pennsylvania grower Wayne Breisch. “Raspberries are one of the more challenging crops I deal with,” says Maine’s vegetable

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Morrill Farm

Morrill Farm is a true family farm, with three generations working together. Here Holly and Dan Perron pose with their five children, left to right: Grace, Laura, Celine, Christian and Catherine. One enterprise on the farm is presenting “living history” events for groups, in which generations of Morrills who started the farm, and their lifestyle,

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Tips Summer 2005

Mind Your Peas and Oats Reel Mowers Solar Water Pumps for Rotational Grazing Cash in on Metal Market Mint Oil Kills or Repels Ants DDT Resources Rye vs. Weeds Sow Oats to Weed and Mulch Strawberries Organic Castup is Better Read and Weed Organic Apple Info Bean and Buckwheat Intercrops Recycled Refrigerator Truck Cooler Stores

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Drip Drip Drip

By Eric Sideman, Ph.D. For information about reproducing this article, please contact MOFGA. Plants need water to grow, and although this is obvious to any farmer or gardener, water availability is the limiting factor to plant growth more often than most realize. More and more growers have become aware of this and are installing irrigation

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Canning

by Jean Ann Pollard “Clostridium botulinum produces the serious neurological and potentially fatal disease commonly known as botulism.” (Fox, Nicols. Spoiled: The Dangerous Truth About a Food Chain Gone Haywire, HarperCollins, N.Y., 1997, p. 59.) Home canning has always been “a notorious breeding ground for a bacterium called Clostridium botulinum,” reports Nicholas Bakalar in Where

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Harvest Kitchen Summer 05

Botanically Confusing, Culinarily Perfect By Roberta Bailey © 2005. For information about reproducing this article, please contact the author. Did you know that the seed-like structures on a strawberry are really a type of fruit called achenes (a small, dry, hard, one-seeded, indehiscent fruit), and that what most of us think of as the fruit

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