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Invasives

Japanese knotweed or Japanese bamboo is not a true bamboo. Eliminating it takes diligence – cutting it back frequently during the growing season and then mulching heavily. English photo. A window covering made by Cleveland artist Eric Vanyo from Japanese knotweed stalks. English photo. Close-up of the bamboo window covering. English photo. By Bruce Blake

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Bee Friendly Farming

Pollinator Profiles More than 270 species of bees are native to Maine. Here are a few that you might see in your meadows and crops this summer: Bumblebees (family Apidae) – Sixteen species of bumblebees live in Maine, ranging in size from under 1/2 inch to about an inch long. They are hairy, and usually

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Winter Grains

Spring Growth Conference 2009 Rick Kersbergen of UMaine Cooperative Extension presented information on a SARE project for growing small winter grains in Maine and Vermont. Small grains might fit into a dairy crop rotation after a corn silage crop to offset corn prices. Kersbergen noted that to feed 10 pounds of barley per cow per

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Heritage Wheats

A small sampling of Eli Rogosa’s display of heritage wheats at MOFGA’s Spring Growth Conference. English photo. Spring Growth Conference 2009 Eli Rogosa spoke at Spring Growth about her work with traditional farmers who grow landrace wheat. She explained the hidden crisis of modern “Green Revolution” wheat, the most widely grown crop on earth, which

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Aroostook Grains

Spring Growth Conference 2009 Matt Williams, whose core farm principle is to help build the food community of Maine, discussed his experiences with growing organic grains for a decade and processing his and others’ organic grains for five years at his Aurora Mills & Farms in Linneus, in Aroostook County. Some 40,000 to 60,000 acres

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Farmer Panel and Bakers Advice

Spring Growth Conference 2009 Dorn Cox of Tuckaway Farm in Lee, N.H., one of the seven farms in the Great Bay Grain Cooperative, said that the co-op farms about 1,500 acres. Members buy portable equipment to share. They hope to grow up to 400 acres of sunflowers, wheat, oats, triticale and rye, mainly for forage

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Sideman Summer 09

By Eric Sideman, Ph.D. Does summertime bode many afternoon hours in the hammock thinking about what’s good in the garden to go with that hamburger hot off the grill – or hours of worrying what could go wrong in that garden, which looks so good this early in the season? Balancing fun with fret is

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Palm Oil

by Margaree Little To stand in the heart of an oil palm plantation in Colombia is to begin to understand the meaning of an industry-proclaimed “environmentalism” that doesn’t take social justice or true sustainability into account. At least that’s how I felt when I visited the Chocó region in the summer of 2007 and traveled

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Whole Grains

By Roberta Bailey Sales in the seed trade were up 30 to 80 percent this spring. The growth was attributed to the increased interest in eating more locally grown food. People are getting closer to their food sources, whether from farmers’ markets and farm stands or a community supported agriculture share, or from locally grown,

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Summer Eating

New potatoes are featured in a Maine Nicoise Salad, which includes other CSA fare: fresh lettuce, marinated yellow beans, cherry tomatoes, eggs and tiny boiled Maine shrimp – all decorated with a few nasturtium flowers. Cheryl Wixson photo. by Cheryl Wixson As cool spring nights give way to longer, warmer days, my taste buds anticipate

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