Archives: Resources

Kiwis

Fruit of mixed cultivars of kiwis at the Teltane Farm booth at the Common Ground Country Fair. Hardy kiwis are not difficult to grow and can be very productive. English photo. by Tom Vigue If you think kiwis are all brown, fuzzy and can be grown only in New Zealand or California, think again. Although

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Rice

by Linda and Takeshi Akaogi In the Sept. 2008 issue of The Maine Organic Farmer & Gardener, Cheryl Bruce reported on efforts by Linda and Takeshi Akaogi to grow rice on their small farm in Putney, Vermont. In March 2008, the couple received a SARE Farmer Grant to evaluate the viability of rice production in

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Forest Management

by Mitch Lansky A thousand-year forest management plan. Am I joking? After all, the United States is only a little over two centuries old. We live in a world of rapidly changing technologies where, in just a decade or so, people have started using personal computers and cell phones on a wide scale. It is

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Tips Fall 2003

Organic for Kids – Seven Tips for Buying Organic Foods 1. When starting out, focus on organic alternatives to the foods your family eats most. 2. Try to add one new organic item to your cart each week. 3. Learn to read the USDA organic labels: 100% organic – may carry the USDA Organic seal

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Sunflowers Fuel a Maine Dairy Farm

Sunflower seed is planted in rows 30″ apart using a tractor-mounted corn planter and cultivated several times with mid-mounted sweeps. These plants were growing at UMaine’s Rogers Farm. Rick Kersbergen photo. by Polly Shyka If the pinecone is Maine’s state flower, then the sunflower, a native, useful, generous and beautiful plant, should be the national

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Terra Madre

Maine is Part of the Scene by Jo Anne Bander Artisan cheeses, jarred artichokes, colored salts, smoked meats, chocolates: Artful displays of such foods at 600 stalls in the Turin, Italy, Lingotto Fiere exhibition center for the seventh Slow Food Salone del Gusto could have been viewed and tasted at any Italian-flavored food show that

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Blue Cohosh

Blue Cohosh. Illustration from USDA Miscellaneous Publication No. 77, Washington, D.C, July, 1930. The Herb Hunters Guide – American Medicinal Plants of Commercial Importance, by A.F. Sievers, Senior Biochemist, Office of Drug and Related Plants, Bureau of Plant Industry. By Deb Soule Blue cohosh (Caulophyllum thalictroides), a member of the Berberidaceae family, is a long-lived

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Edamame

By Roberta Bailey This summer I trialed 10 varieties of green soybeans for a local seed company. I planted and labeled each variety carefully, then took notes at various stages of development. The crowning event was the edamame (green soybean) taste-off. I steamed each variety separately, then shelled them into individual bowls. All of them

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Edible Flowers

Toki Oshima drawing They look and smell pretty in the garden, attract bees, and add color and inspiration to your cooking. So why don’t we use more of them? By Ellie MacDougall Soon after I began to grow vegetables, I realized that flowers have a place in the same garden. In fact, I don’t have

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Celeriac

Toki Oshima drawing By Jean Ann Pollard What’s so round, so firm, so – strangely hairy? If you’ve never seen celeriac, you couldn’t guess. The literature has few references to it – at least in America. It’s a root vegetable that’s been around for about 4000 years, but its lack of publicity wouldn’t tell you

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