Tag: Herbs

Herbal Support

Milky oat seeds make a tonic that can help strengthen the nervous system. Illustration from Handbook of Plant and Floral Ornament from Early Herbals, by Richard G. Hatton, Dover Publications, N.Y., 1960. By Deb Soule Some of the stresses humans are experiencing today are more complex than they were 100 years ago. The threat of

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Horsetails

Equisetum hyemale is the species of horsetail that grows in the mid-South, while E. arvense (below) grows in New England. Both species benefit bones and other aspects of health. Illustrations by Leslie Wood. By Leslie Wood, with Fredda Paul Spring shoots of horsetail have just begun to come up from the earth. In the early

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Black Cohosh

Black cohosh leaves and flowers. English photos. In the early ’80s, while studying the native medicinal plants of North Carolina, I first met black cohosh. I found it growing wild in the Appalachian Mountains. Its 4- to 5-foot-tall, white flowering spires (racemes) were stunning to come upon in the grand forests. I immediately took a

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Sorrel

  Sorrel can grow large and ragged over the summer, and goes to seed. Cut it back in August to produce succulent, young growth again the fall. Protect the plants with a cold frame or other cover and you’ll be able to harvest these tangy leaves well into the fall. English photo. By Jean Ann

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Herb Garden

Photo courtesy of Blessed Maine Herbs. By Gail Faith Edwards The spring equinox approaches, and a new growing season begins! The calendar below details the steps we took in planting Blessed Maine Herb Farm’s gardens last spring and can guide you with your own herb garden. Blessings! March 18 – Today we planted six flats

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Blue Cohosh

Blue Cohosh. Illustration from USDA Miscellaneous Publication No. 77, Washington, D.C, July, 1930. The Herb Hunters Guide – American Medicinal Plants of Commercial Importance, by A.F. Sievers, Senior Biochemist, Office of Drug and Related Plants, Bureau of Plant Industry. By Deb Soule Blue cohosh (Caulophyllum thalictroides), a member of the Berberidaceae family, is a long-lived

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Sacred Basil

Sacred basil is sacred in India and could well be sacred wherever it is grown. It has many medicinal qualities and makes a refreshing tea. English photo. By Deb Soule Sacred basil or holy basil is native to India and is valued greatly for its medicinal properties and spiritual significance in Ayurvedic medicine and among

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For the Love of Lovage

Lovage emerges in the spring with succulent leaves. You can keep using the plant into the fall if you keep it clipped so that it produces young growth continuously. English photo. By Jean Ann Pollard “This herbe for hys sweete savoure is used in bathe.” – Thomas Hyll, The Gardener’s Labyrinth, 1577 It’s not too

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Pesto

Basil can be harvested throughout the summer and into fall to make pesto. Freeze some pesto in ice cube trays for winter use. English photo. By Jean Ann Pollard “This [basil] is the herb which all authors are together by the ears about and rail at one another (like lawyers).” – Nicholas Culpepper, The English

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Ashwagandha

By Deb Soule This article is for information only; please consult a health care practitioner if you have a serious medical problem. Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) is a member of the nightshade family. It grows as an annual in northern New England. This herb grows as a semihardy evergreen shrub in its native habitat of India,

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