Tag: Health

Black Cohosh

Black cohosh leaves and flowers. English photos. By Deb Soule In the early ’80s, while studying the native medicinal plants of North Carolina, I first met black cohosh growing wild in the Appalachian Mountains. Its 4- to 5-foot-tall, white flowering spires (racemes) were stunning to come upon in the deciduous forests. I immediately took a

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Fatty Acids

By Jean English Fatty acids are straight chains of carbon (C) atoms that have hydrogen (H) atoms attched. The beginning of the fatty acid is a methyl (CH3) group, and the end is a carboxyl (COOH) group. The carbon atoms are numbered from 1, at the beginning, to n, at the end. Omega-3 fatty acids

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Blue Cohosh

Blue Cohosh. Illustration from USDA Miscellaneous Publication No. 77, Washington, D.C, July, 1930. The Herb Hunters Guide – American Medicinal Plants of Commercial Importance, by A.F. Sievers, Senior Biochemist, Office of Drug and Related Plants, Bureau of Plant Industry. By Deb Soule Blue cohosh (Caulophyllum thalictroides), a member of the Berberidaceae family, is a long-lived

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Sacred Basil

Sacred basil is sacred in India and could well be sacred wherever it is grown. It has many medicinal qualities and makes a refreshing tea. English photo. By Deb Soule Sacred basil or holy basil is native to India and is valued greatly for its medicinal properties and spiritual significance in Ayurvedic medicine and among

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Probiotics

By Diane Schivera Beneficial bacteria, such as Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium bifidum, are called probiotics. Probiotics, according to the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations, are live microorganisms administered in adequate amounts which confer a beneficial health effect on the host. The concept of maintaining or restoring the balance of bowel bacteria

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Neurological Disorders

By Jean English Is a dietary deficiency of vitamin A or B6 linked to autism? Can nutrient deficiencies cause some cases of bipolar disorder? Can Tourette syndrome symptoms be triggered by mold in homes and schools, by offgassing of formaldehyde from building materials, or by flashing lights? These are some of the questions that editor

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Quality Fats

By Bill Emerson According to the Weston A. Price Foundation, eating wholesome fatty foods is good for your health! The logic, anthropological observations and impressive research that this nonprofit organization presents on this subject are truly compelling. As a result, foundation president Sally Fallon claims that our bodies do need wholesome, saturated fats, and, in

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Self Heal

Self-heal or heal-all (Prunella vulgaris) is reputed to help treat deep wounds, including those of emotional origin. It has also been used to help remove mercury from the body. Illustration from Handbook of Plant and Floral Ornament from Early Herbals, by Richard G. Hatton, Dover, N.Y., 1960. By Deb Soule The names of plants and

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Ashwagandha

Withania somnifera, aka ashwagandha. Photo courtesy of Cal Lemke, Dept. of Botany and Microbiology, Oklahoma University. By Deb Soule Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) is a member of the nightshade family and can be grown as an annual in northern New England. In its native habitat in India (including 6000 feet high in the Himalayas), northern Africa

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Eggs

By Diane Schivera Many natural barriers help prevent bacteria from entering eggs. The “bloom” or “cuticle,” a gelatinous covering that dries after the egg emerges from the hen, helps seal the pores in the shell, reducing moisture loss and bacterial penetration. The many egg membranes also help prevent the passage of bacteria. The shell membranes

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