Category: Herbs

Black Cohosh

Black cohosh leaves and flowers. English photos. By Deb Soule In the early ’80s, while studying the native medicinal plants of North Carolina, I first met black cohosh growing wild in the Appalachian Mountains. Its 4- to 5-foot-tall, white flowering spires (racemes) were stunning to come upon in the deciduous forests. I immediately took a

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Herb Garden

Photo courtesy of Blessed Maine Herbs. By Gail Faith Edwards The spring equinox approaches, and a new growing season begins! The calendar below details the steps we took in planting Blessed Maine Herb Farm’s gardens last spring and can guide you with your own herb garden. Blessings! March 18 – Today we planted six flats

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Blue Cohosh

Blue Cohosh. Illustration from USDA Miscellaneous Publication No. 77, Washington, D.C, July, 1930. The Herb Hunters Guide – American Medicinal Plants of Commercial Importance, by A.F. Sievers, Senior Biochemist, Office of Drug and Related Plants, Bureau of Plant Industry. By Deb Soule Blue cohosh (Caulophyllum thalictroides), a member of the Berberidaceae family, is a long-lived

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Sacred Basil

Sacred basil is sacred in India and could well be sacred wherever it is grown. It has many medicinal qualities and makes a refreshing tea. English photo. By Deb Soule Sacred basil or holy basil is native to India and is valued greatly for its medicinal properties and spiritual significance in Ayurvedic medicine and among

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Self Heal

Self-heal or heal-all (Prunella vulgaris) is reputed to help treat deep wounds, including those of emotional origin. It has also been used to help remove mercury from the body. Illustration from Handbook of Plant and Floral Ornament from Early Herbals, by Richard G. Hatton, Dover, N.Y., 1960. By Deb Soule The names of plants and

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Ashwagandha

Withania somnifera, aka ashwagandha. Photo courtesy of Cal Lemke, Dept. of Botany and Microbiology, Oklahoma University. By Deb Soule Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) is a member of the nightshade family and can be grown as an annual in northern New England. In its native habitat in India (including 6000 feet high in the Himalayas), northern Africa

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Cilantro

Cilantro and coriander, from Koehler’s Medicinal-Plants, 1887. by Roberta Bailey Cilantro is an herb that arouses extreme passions. People either love it or hate it. It has a pungent, parsley-citrus flavor and aroma that makes people salivate with anticipation or completely avoid the dish that contains it. Cilantro is the leaf and coriander is the

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Epazote

Epazote can be grown in Maine and added to Mexican dishes. Photo courtesy of Pete Nutile, Photographer, Johnny’s Selected Seeds. by Jason Moore Local farmers’ markets are an excellent source of traditional organic produce, such as sweet corn, peas and tomatoes, but also of regional and ethnic favorites, such as fresh fiddleheads, chicory, okra or

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Brenda Lynn Gould Traditional Community Herbalist

By Joyce White Copyright 2006 Brenda Lynn Gould, an herbalist specializing in medicinal mushrooms, tries to empower interested people to learn and use what’s in their own back yards to create and maintain good health. Just as she learned from her parents, grandparents and other elders, as well as from the plants themselves, she’d like

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