Tag: Greenhouse

Second Generation Rolling High Tunnel

The basic 22 x 48 metal frame of my moveable high tunnel. This size allows for sufficient ventilation through end wall vents. The sliding side-wall entrance alleviates the necessity for an end-wall entrance, so the end walls are stronger. By Phil Norris Photos by the author Here in Maine, the short growing season makes some

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Spains Climate Changing Produce Growing Town of Tunnels

Eric Sideman alongside one of the high tunnels in Almería, Spain, where the density of reflective tunnels has lowered temperatures in the area. Becky Sideman photo By Eric Sideman, Ph.D. Those of you who know me know that I never look forward to leaving my farm. I have to be talked into traveling – and

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Prototype High Tunnel

This 22- by 49-foot high tunnel at Stutzman’s Farm in Sangerville is made from native white cedar, using an innovative design by Sunny Stutzman. Detail of the structure. Two side vents – one at each end of the house – are gas-powered and can be set to open at a specific temperature. Close-up of a

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High Tunnels

Speakers at MOFGA’s November 2012 Farmer to Farmer Conference addressed three crops suitable for growing in high tunnels: raspberries, ginger and winter sprouting broccoli. Raspberries in High Tunnels – Prospects for Maine David Handley of UMaine Cooperative Extension said that raspberries are challenging to grow, especially regarding labor. They’re the one crop he deals with

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Nitrate Accumulation

A Growers’ Guide By Eric Sideman, Ph.D. Director of Technical Services, MOFGA Local production for local consumption is a guiding principle for sustainable organic growing, but winter months are challenging for us in New England. Most growers hang up their tools and park their equipment, and consumers are left buying vegetables that have traveled thousands

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High Tunnels

The 2010 Farmer to Farmer Conference at Point Lookout in Northport, Maine, featured a session on managing soils in high tunnels. Speakers were Vern Grubinger, University of Vermont vegetable and berry specialist; Bruce Hoskins of the University of Maine Diagnostic Lab; and Paul Volckhausen, who, with his wife Karen, grows organic tomatoes and other crops

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Pest Control

A Natural System Just Dying for Balance By Jean English Michael Zuck gave an inspiring talk at MOFGA and Cooperative Extension’s Farmer to Farmer Conference about using teosinte and other plants as “banker plants” in greenhouses – plants that support pests that, in turn, support beneficial insects. English photo. Michael Zuck’s fascination with nature’s multiple

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Greenhouse

Biological Controls and Other Lower Toxicity Methods By Colin D. Stewart, Ph.D., University of Maine Cooperative Extension Homeowner/Greenhouse IPM Specialist This article discusses many lower toxicity pest control measures, including biological controls. The key to using biologicals successfully is to monitor your greenhouse regularly to detect and correctly identify pests and to introduce the correct

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Hoop Houses

Chris Cavendish, who was MOFGA’s farmer-in-residence at the time, talked about some of his favorite tools at the Small Farm Field Day in Unity last July. English photo. By Jean English Chris Cavendish, who was MOFGA’s farmer-in-residence for the past two years, talked about his experiences growing crops in and out of a hoop house

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Tiny Greenhouse

This 8’ x 8’ hoophouse was built from scrap materials and $50 worth of new materials at Unity College, to see if that area could supply greens through the winter.  The College’sregulation-sized hoophouse, used in an herbaceous gardening class, is in the background. English photo. Troubleshooting on the Ground by Holli Cederholm Situated in the

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