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  You are here:  PublicationsMaine Organic Farmer & GardenerSummer 2007Resources Summer 07   
 Resources – Summer 2007 Minimize

Scroll down or click on the heading to read about the following resources:

How to Propagate

Techniques and Tips for Over 1000 Plants


New Web Site Helps Manage Dairy Nitrogen
A free, interactive Web site can help dairy producers manage nitrogen on their farms better.

Anaerobic Digesters for Manure-to-Methane Evaluated
Anaerobic digesters are gaining popularity as a way to convert manure to methane, which can fuel an electrical generator.

Soils Resource
The Web site for the USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service.

Free Online Sustainable Ag Course
A new National Continuing Education Program in Sustainable Agriculture online course.



How to Propagate
Techniques and Tips for Over 1000 Plants

by John Cushnie
Ball Publishing, Distributed by Independent Publishers Group
2007, $34.95, 256 pages, hardcover, color photographs
At bookstores and through Ball Publishing, 335 N. River St., Batavia, IL 60510, 1-888-888-0013, www.ballpublishing.com

In clear, step-by-step instructions and photographs, How to Propagate details how to sow seed, take cuttings, divide, layer and graft over 1,000 plants. Information details plant hygiene, temperature and humidity, and care of new plants.

New Web Site Helps Manage Dairy Nitrogen

A free, interactive Web site can help dairy producers manage nitrogen on their farms better. Jack Meisinger, a soil scientist with the Environmental Management and By-Product Utilization Laboratory of USDA-ARS at Beltsville, Maryland, helped develop "Nitrogen Management on Dairy Farms," which can be accessed at www.dairyn.cornell.edu. There, users will find 58 linked pages of mixed-media content covering management of crops and soils, feed storage, dairy herd nutrition and manure use.

Instruction is provided on sampling and testing manure, soil and crops for nitrogen; and on interpreting test results and calculating the amount of plant-available nitrogen present in a manure sample. Given the high cost of fertilizer, accounting for manure nitrogen can greatly improve farm profitability. A downloadable spreadsheet, called the "Manure Nutrient Calculator," provides an example of a manure-crediting system used in New York state.

State and federal research on managing the fate and transport of nitrogen in animal manure is used to formulate best-management practices. Case studies on the site illustrate changes farmers have made to reduce nutrient imbalances and losses by taking a whole-farm approach to nutrient management.

Source: Agricultural Research Service News Service, USDA, Sharon Durham, (301) 504-1611, sharon.durham@ars.usda.gov, March 12, 2007. For more information, see the March 2007  Agricultural Research magazine, at www.ars.usda.gov/is/AR/archive/mar07/dairy0307.htm.

Anaerobic Digesters for Manure-to-Methane Evaluated

Anaerobic digesters are gaining popularity as a way to convert manure to methane, which can fuel an electrical generator. The technology provides a way to dispose of manure and avoid associated odors while generating usable energy. Dairy farmers considering the technology can benefit from reports from the California Energy Commission, which evaluated five dairy digester systems.  See
www.energy.ca.gov/pier/iaw/reports/index.html

Source: 
ATTRA Weekly Harvest Newsletter, Jan. 24, 2007, www.attra.ncat.org

Soils Resource

The Ancient Rule – "Whatever is affixed to the soil belongs to the soil" – is just one of the “soil quotations” at http://soils.usda.gov/ , the site for the USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service. On the site you can find soil survey maps, great educational resources about soils, uses for various soils and more – including more quotes, and a page where you (or a child) can sign up for a soil critter pen-pal. 

Free Online Sustainable Ag Course

The USDA-SARE (Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education Program) has a new National Continuing Education Program in Sustainable Agriculture online course for agricultural professionals. The free, user-friendly, self-paced course is a detailed introduction to sustainable agriculture and its meaning for farmers, ranchers and communities. It explains how sustainable concepts and principles relate to the roles of educators as they try to improve farming and ranching systems. Learn more at www.sare.org/coreinfo/ceprogram.htm.



    

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