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MOFGA's Farmer to Farmer Conference

November 4-6, 2017

MOFGA’s Farmer to Farmer Conference …

  • Is known for its intimacy, in-depth treatment of topics, and amazing discussions.
  • Is based on the idea that farmers learn best from their peers and other practitioners.
  • Features prominent and accessible university faculty, extension educators, and other agricultural professionals.
  • Features a unique 3-hour workshop session format, in which one half is dedicated to talks by both agricultural service professionals and farmers, and the other to a round table discussion intended to solicit and capitalize on the accumulated knowledge of all the farmers in attendance.
  • Serves delicious meals featuring local, organic food.
  • Is a rare and wonderful opportunity to get off the farm and catch up with fellow farmers.

Learn, eat, share and connect with
old friends and new at MOFGA's
2017 Farmer to Farmer Conference!


 

Online registration closed; walk-ins welcome!
Schedule-at-a-Glance (PDF)
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About The ConferenceSession DetailsRegistrationAccommodationsScholarships

2017 Keynote Address:
Emily Oakley,
Three Springs Farm
Oaks, Oklahoma

Family Farmers in a Changing Organic World
As organic foods gain an ever wider audience and consumer base, family farmers find themselves in a challenging position. U.S. organics has grown from a back-to-the-land movement into a $47 billion dollar industry that even Amazon wants to join. What does that mean for smaller-scale farmers? With organic foods now available in most towns and big box stores around the country, the value and trust in local organic food is greater than ever. With companies entering organics motivated largely by profit, how do we keep organic standards true to the foundations of the movement? Emily will share her experiences as a full-time organic farmer in Oklahoma, how that shapes her role as a representative on the USDA’s National Organic Standards Board, and why it matters that growers get and stay certified, get counted, and become active in advocating for standards they believe in.

Emily Oakley (right) with her partner Mike Appel and their daughter Lisette.
Emily Oakley co-owns and operates Three Springs Farm, a diversified, certified-organic vegetable and fruit farm in eastern Oklahoma. With her partner Mike, she cultivates over three dozen different crops and more than 100 individual varieties on four acres of land. They sell all of their produce directly to their customers through the Tulsa Farmers Market and a 130-member CSA program. Their goal is to maintain a two-person operation that demonstrates the economic viability of small-scale farming. Emily is currently serving as a producer representative on the USDA’s National Organic Standards Board.
 

Saturday Farm Tours

On Saturday, November 4, we will tour Six River Farm and Left Field Farm in Bowdoinham.

Six River Farm

Gabrielle Gosselin and Nate Drummond own and operate Six River Farm. We are an organic vegetable farm located in Bowdoinham, in the belt of rich alluvial farmland adjacent to the north shore of Merrymeeting Bay. We focus on producing high quality fresh produce throughout the entire year and marketing locally within the Brunswick-Freeport area.

The farm started in 2007 on 9 acres of land leased on the Kelley Farm property (we grew 2.5 acres of vegetables that year). Over the last ten years we have grown incrementally, adding field and four-season greenhouse production. In 2016 we grew approximately 16 acres of organic vegetable crops, including over 2 acres of high-tunnel production. We continue to market the majority of our produce (over 95%) direct to customers, restaurants and retailers in the Brunswick-Freeport area.

The farm operates on 38 acres of farmland, all comprised of prime silt-loam soils. The 38 acres includes 8 acres that we own personally and 19 acres that are part of the collectively owned Kelley Farm property.  The farm leases washing, storage, and refrigeration space at George Christopher’s barn complex at 496 Brown’s Point Road and a Potting Shed/Greenhouse that we own personally at 46 Center Point Road.

Our farm is made possible by the hard work of our employees. In 2017 we employed six full-time year-round employees, eight full-time seasonal employees (May-Nov) and an additional three part-time farmers’ market staff.

Left Field Farm

Sean Hagan started Left Field Farm in 2012. The farm grows a diversity of vegetables on 8 acres along Merrymeeting Bay in Bowdoinham, Maine. They sell their produce through a CSA farm share program and to local stores and restaurants. They strive to farm in a manner that maintains and improves soil health. Techniques such as crop rotations and cover cropping to build organic matter and increase the biological activity of the soil are important to their work.

The farm fields are adjacent to those of Six River Farm which allows for some sharing of equipment. With three other farms, they also share a wash/pack barn, walk-in cooler, and storage area.

 
Gabrielle Gosselin (left) and Nate Drummond of Six River Farm
Sean Hagan of Left Field Farm
​​Research on Adapting to Extreme Weather

A SARE funded research project is conducting a survey to identify emerging trends and innovative strategies which farmers are using to successfully adapt to extreme weather on vegetable and berry farms in New England. The purpose of this study is to generate usable information, and is based on the idea that many farmers are actively and successfully adapting to severe weather to sustain the economic viability and ecological health of their farms. Six farmer organizations in New England are participating in the study to facilitate knowledge exchange across networks within the region, including MOFGA, NEVBGA, NOFA, CISA, Northeast Permaculture Network, and the VTVBGA.

The results of the regional survey will be shared back to MOFGA farmers next year, along with opportunities for producers to weigh in on what the research results mean to them, and identify what resources are needed to support farmers in adapting to extreme weather.

Please consider participating and sharing your experience with the regional community of growers. The survey can be found at
​​https://www.uvm.edu/agroecology/adaptationsurvey​​. This project is supported by Northeast SARE and the USDA Northeast Climate Hub.

Ducktrap Discussions

Please consider joining us for open community discussions over a meal in the Ducktrap Room:

Meet-up with New Farmers and Service Providers
Sunday Lunch (12:30 to 2:00 p.m.)
Informal roundtable discussions to meet various service providers and learn how to access financial, technical and other farm support resources available from agencies across the state

State of Organic Discussion
Monday breakfast (before keynote) (7:00 a.m. to 8:30 a.m.)
Facilitated discussion and feedback session around potential changes and the integrity of organic standards, marketing "MOFGA Certified Organic" in Maine and proposals for new labels and certifications

Established Farmer Focus Group
Monday lunch (11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.)
Help MOFGA serve your needs better!
We are looking to grow our programming for established farmers and are particularly seeking input from farmers with ~5+ years of experience, successes, challenges and ideas to share. Please join us for a facilitated discussion to provide feedback on current MOFGA programs and guidance on the type of educational, technical assistance and farm viability programs that would make you most successful.



KEYNOTE ADDRESS:
Emily Oakley

Check our 2017 list of workshops below to see the range of topics offered at the conference!

Sessions: Sunday Morning | Sunday Afternoon | Monday Morning | Monday Afternoon

2017 Keynote Address
Monday morning – 8:30-9:45

Emily Oakley, Three Springs Farm
Oaks, Oklahoma

Family Farmers in a Changing Organic World

As organic foods gain an ever wider audience and consumer base, family farmers find themselves in a challenging position. U.S. organics has grown from a back-to-the-land movement into a $47 billion dollar industry that even Amazon wants to join. What does that mean for smaller-scale farmers?  With organic foods now available in most towns and big box stores around the country, the value and trust in local organic food is greater than ever. With companies entering organics motivated largely by profit, how do we keep organic standards true to the foundations of the movement? Emily will share her experiences as a full-time organic farmer in Oklahoma, how that shapes her role as a representative on the USDA’s National Organic Standards Board, and why it matters that growers get and stay certified, get counted, and become active in advocating for standards they believe in.

Emily Oakley (right)
Emily Oakley co-owns and operates Three Springs Farm, a diversified, certified-organic vegetable and fruit farm in eastern Oklahoma. With her partner Mike, she cultivates over three dozen different crops and more than 100 individual varieties on four acres of land. They sell all of their produce directly to their customers through the Tulsa Farmers Market and a 130-member CSA program. Their goal is to maintain a two-person operation that demonstrates the economic viability of small-scale farming. Emily is currently serving as a producer representative on the USDA’s National Organic Standards Board.

 


Our 2017 Schedule

Sunday a.m. (9:15-12:15)

A. Strategies for Optimizing Yields in Organic Wild Blueberry Production***
Nicolas Lindholm, Blue Hill Berry Co., Penobscot
David Yarborough, UMaine Cooperative Extension

Many growers have faced the challenge of wanting to increase yields without increasing weed pressure. Several have experimented with such techniques and products as applying organically approved fertilizers, hand-weeding and mulching, timing of pruning and using elemental sulfur to lower the soil pH. In this workshop growers will explain and explore what they know from their successes and failures. David Yarborough will present information from several UMaine studies, including its organic production research in the early 2000s and a more recent systems analysis. Nicolas Lindholm will present findings from his 4-year SARE-funded research project using ramial chip mulch and fertilizer applications on his farm in Penobscot. Participants will have plenty of opportunity to share experiences, whether they worked or not, and to ask questions. Regardless of your production scale, there is much to learn and discuss about the challenges and possibilities of optimal production. *** 3 pesticide applicator credits

B. Farming: The First Five Years
Jim Buckle, Buckle Farm, Unity
Michael Dennett, Crescent Run Farm, Gardiner
Ben Whatley, Whatley Farm, Topsham
Brenna Mae Thomas-Googins, Patch Farm, Denmark, Maine

A panel of four farmers who represent a variety of animal and crop enterprises and marketing outlets will share broadly what worked for them and what they would do differently in their beginning years of farming.

C. Organic Carrot Production***
Jean-Paul Courtens, Roxbury Farm, Kinderhook, N.Y.
Seth Yentes, North Branch Farm, Monroe

What is tiny-seeded and stands no chance against weeds? If you are considering streamlining and improving your carrot production, look no further. Hear how Jean-Paul Courtens and Seth Yentes make carrots work for their two different operations. *** 3 pesticide applicator credits

D. Cornell Research on Innovative Parasite Management for Sheep and Goats***
Tatiana Stanton, Cornell University
Kaili Wardwell, Abraham's Goat Farm & Creamery, Newport

Tatiana Stanton has been working with researchers from the University of Rhode Island and with many farmers, including Kaili Wardwell, on feeding birdsfoot trefoil to sheep and goats to control internal parasites. She and Wardwell will discuss results of the project, and tatiana will discuss other recent research on parasite control. *** 3 pesticide applicator credits

E. Choosing and Building an Irrigation System
Trevor Hardy, Brookdale Farm, Hollis, N.H.
John Bliss, Broadturn Farm, Scarborough

A grower cannot take water for granted. If there is not enough, the crops will suffer. Trevor Hardy knows how to determine how much water crops need and how to get it to them. John Bliss has tried numerous irrigation methods and knows what works on his farm. The two will talk about technical and practical irrigation information.

F. Making Wholesale Work
Carly DelSignore, Tide Mill Farm, Edmunds
Andre Cantelmo, Heron Pond Farm, S. Hampton, N.H.
Ian Jerolmack, Stonecipher Farm, Bowdoinham

This three-farmer panel will focus on the experiences and decisions that have made wholesale sales work on their farms. Topics will include marketing strategies, scale choices, infrastructure and more.

G. Growing Grains***
Johanna Davis and Adam Nordell, Songbird Farm, Unity
Sam Mudge, Grange Corner Farm, Lincolnville

Oats, corn, wheat and more! Learn the basics of growing your own grains from Sam Mudge,Johanna Davis and Adam Nordell. Diversify your offerings and add grains to your rotation! *** 3 pesticide applicator credits

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Sunday p.m. (2:30-5:30)

H. Strategies for Developing Efficient Scale-appropriate Systems for Your Farm*
Jean-Paul Courtens and Jody Bolluyt, Roxbury Farm and Hudson Valley Farm Hub, Kinderhook, N.Y.
Emily Oakley and Mike Appel, Three Streams Farm, Oaks, Oklahoma

When it comes to the bottom line, it’s not necessarily the size of your farm that matters but what you do with it … This foundational workshop will present a scale-agnostic concept for developing smart, efficient and harmonious farm systems that maximize profit margins, crop quality and quality of life. This kind of systems-based approach is not only about the tools we choose but also about the cultural practices and procedures we adopt. For instance, crop rotations that prevent and decrease the weed seed bank are as important as the tools we choose to eradicate the weeds. To anchor these principles in practice, Jean-Paul Courtens and Emily Oakley will share the decision-making processes and key farm systems that they have developed across a wide range of farm scales and marketing channels. As harvest constitutes a significant proportion of labor expense, they will give special attention to harvest system efficiencies, including consideration of Food Safety Modernization Act guidelines. * 1 pesticide applicator credit

I. Marketing Organic Wild Blueberries
Nicolas Lindholm, Blue Hill Berry Co., Penobscot
Theresa Gaffney, Highland Blueberry Farm, Stockton Springs
Todd Merrill, Merrill Blueberry Farms, Hancock

This workshop will address marketing ideas that growers and processors of organic wild blueberries currently use, from large-scale fresh-pack to retail and wholesale frozen to value-added products and web-based sales. Many challenges are facing our wild blueberry industry now, not the least of which is finding, accessing or even creating markets for the ever-increasing supply of the crop, with competition coming from Canadian wild blueberries as well as high-bush blueberries from around the world. But some growers and marketers are finding that the demand is strong and growing, especially for Maine organic wild blueberries. Nicolas Lindholm of Blue Hill Berry Co. has focused his marketing on direct sales of fresh and frozen berries, including through farmers’ markets, group orders, pre-orders, selling to other CSAs, health food and grocery stores, as well as selling and shipping frozen berries from his website. Theresa Gaffney owns Highland Blueberry Farms/Highland Organics in Stockton Springs and has been a leader and innovator of new value-added organic wild blueberry products, with experience selling at farmers’ markets, on the farm, to retail store outlets and online from her website. Todd Merrill is the president of Merrill Blueberry Farms in Hancock, which was the first IQF (Individually Quick Frozen) processor to be certified for processing organic wild blueberries and is considered one of the leading buyers for organic growers looking to market their crop. We will all share our knowledge of existing markets and explore new ideas for marketing and adding value to Maine's organic wild blueberry crop.

J. Organic Pricing: Past, Present and Future
Jed Beach, 3 Bug Farm, Lincolnville
Heather Omand, MOFGA’s organic marketing specialist
Brady Hatch, Morning Dew Farm, Newcastle
Prentice Grassi, Villagside Farm, Freedom

This session on organic pricing will include 
* a three-farmer panel discussing how they set prices, including methods, factors for consideration, and the importance of setting realistic prices
* Jed Beach talking about pricing as it relates to scale; i.e., when it makes sense to lower prices for wholesale markets
* Heather Omand sharing a look at organic pricing over the past decade as well as results from a 2017 pricing evaluation at different market channels
* a robust discussion between speakers and attendees on the current and future state of organic pricing

K. Improving Soil Organic Matter – Understanding Qualities, Benefits and Strategies**
Ellen Mallory, UMaine Cooperative Extension
Eric Sideman, MOFGA’s organic crop specialist

Soil organic matter,the keystone of soil health and productivity, makes up only a small fraction of soil mass but has enormous impacts. Learn new scientific information about how soil organic matter is built and lost, its benefits to sustainable crop production, and management strategies to improve organic matter on the farms. We’ll discuss examples from Eric’s practices on his East Wind Farm in the hills of New Hampshire, from Maine Soil Health Team projects (coordinated by Ellen) and from workshop participants. ** 2 pesticide applicator credits

L. David, Goliath and Organic Seed Production
Jim Gerritsen, Wood Prairie Farm, Bridgewater, and Organic Seed Growers and Trade Association (OSGATA)
Petra Mann-Page, Fruition Seeds, Naples, N.Y.

Driven by economic and agronomic forces, most commercial seed production is concentrated in the more arid environments of the West, Midwest and abroad rather than the smaller farms and shorter, wetter season of the Northeast. But the lesson of David and Goliath tells us that advantages are not always advantages and disadvantages are not always disadvantages. As climates change, markets adapt and decentralization becomes necessity, the new opportunities for organic seed production in the Northeast may outweigh the challenges. Experienced organic seed growers and regional retail seed company operators Petra Page-Mann and Jim Gerritsen will share their perspectives on the opportunities, challenges and eco-imperative for strengthening regional seed production. Hear and share the vision of a Northeast-focused organic seed system choosing community and collaboration rather than industrial commodity.

M. Grass-fed Sheep and Goat Dairy Management
tatiana Stanton, Cornell University
Maryrose Livingston, Northland Sheep Dairy, Marathon, N.Y.

Maryrose Livingston and her husband, Donn Hewes, own and operate Northland Sheep Dairy, the oldest sheep dairy in the United States. Their flock has been 100 percent grass-fed since 2002 and is certified organic by NOFA-NY. Maryrose will discuss their grazing system and management strategies that support 100 percent grass-fed production. tatiana Stanton has been assisting sheep and goat producers for many years and will share her considerable knowledge on grain-free production.

N. Alternatives to Grain for Pigs
Jeff Mattocks, Fertrell, Bainbridge, Penn.
Randy Canarr, Souder Station Farm, Winterport

Pigs are a useful addition to a livestock or vegetable farm – eating leftover vegetables and clearing land for pasture. Hear Jeff Mattocks and farmer and military veteran Randy Canarr speak about sources and methods of using alternative feeds to vary the diet of your pigs and reduce that grain cost.

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Monday a.m. (10-11:30)

O. Medicinal Herbs
Kathi Langelier, Herbal Revolution Farm and Apothecary, Union
Interested in learning how to propagate medicinal herbs for production and processing them into value-added products, as well as the ethical wild harvesting of herbs around the farm? Join Katheryn Langelier as she describes her on-farm medicinal herb production and processing of these crops into value-added medicinal products.

P. Preparing for Food Safety Regulations
Jason Bolton and Robson Machado, UMaine Cooperative Extension
The Food Safety Modernization Act is now law, and produce growers and packers of all sizes will have to adhere to many requirements. Dr. Jason Bolton and Dr. Robson Machado will present all the information needed to understand compliance with these rules, including supervisor and worker training, record keeping, facility requirements, water testing, wildlife intrusion and manure use. This law will impact your farm; now is the time to prepare.

Q. Low Impact Forestry and the Small Farm Woodlot
Peter Hagerty, Peace Fleece, Porter
Richard Lee and Kate Del Vecchio, Tender Soles Farm, Richmond
Come learn how to incorporate your woodlot into a holistic farm system. We will discuss treating the woodlot as the winter garden, concentrating not only on harvesting but also on the importance of soil care and the trees' ability to sequester carbon and mitigate the effects of global warming.

R. Production-scale Broilers: Health Care and Management Q&A*
Jeff Mattocks, Fertrell, Bainbridge, Penn.
Poultry health can be confusing, with so many possible causes of illnesses and so many solutions. Jeff Mattocks will talk about many of these potential problems, including mycotoxins. He will address baseline growth rates, guides for determining whether you are on the right track, and solutions for problems. * 1 pesticide applicator credit

S. Cheesemaking at Northland Dairy
Maryrose Livingston, Northland Sheep Dairy, Marathon, N.Y.
Maryrose Livingston will describe the farm system and structure of Northland Sheep Dairy, the oldest sheep dairy in the United States, as well as the economics of a small farm with longevity.

T. Farm in the Spotlight: Happy Town Farm
Paul and Karen Volckhausen, Happy Town Farm, Orland
Karen and Paul Volckhausen own Happy Town Farm in Orland, which is a diversified, certified organic farm currently with three acres of crop land, eight acres of pasture, and five hoop houses. They have produced vegetables, flowers and maple syrup and have raised animals since 1981. Their focus is selling locally through CSAs, farmers markets, stores, and restaurants.

U. Q & A with Experienced Women Farmers
Megan Gerritsen, Wood Prairie Farm, Bridgewater
Beth Schiller, Dandelion Springs Farm, Newcastle
Jody Bolluyt, Roxbury Farm, Kinderhook, N.Y.
Anna Shapley-Quinn, North Branch Farm, Monroe

Our panel will delve into the particular challenges and advantages that women farmers experience. How do you get over perceived gender barriers? Are
resources, hints and tips available? Where do we need more support? How do you balance family and farming roles? Be inspired by some remarkable women farmers!

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Monday p.m. (1:30-4:30)

V. Capturing Sales on the Web
Theresa Gaffney, Highland Organics, Stockton Springs
Jim Gerritsen, Wood Prairie Farm, Bridgewater
Simon Frost, Thirty Acre Farm, Whitefield

Learn about expanding your markets into the world of online sales. Discussion will focus on opportunities and challenges of selling online, how to be most effective in making online sales, and the logistics of selling online (website management, shopping cart management, shipping, etc.).

W. Cover Crop Combinations and Timing**
Carl Johanson, Goranson Farm, Dresden
Jason Lilley, UMaine Cooperative Extension

Growing multiple varieties of cover crops in a mix may reduce weeds and enhance soil health better than each variety growing alone. Hear from Jason Lilley and Carl Johanson about the concept and practice of multi-variety cover crops. ** 2 pesticide applicator credits

X. Livestock Scale and Infrastructure
Jean Noon, The Noon Family Sheep Farm, Springvale
Jake Galle and Abby Sadauckas, Apple Creek Farm, Bowdoinham

Find out what goes into choosing a scale of livestock production, and the infrastructure/design considerations that go along with that scale. Apple Creek Farm and The Noon Family Sheep Farm will share tips to consider before you get started, and what they might have done differently.

Y. Family [and] Farming
Polly Shyka, Villageside Farm, Freedom
Emily Oakley and Mike Appel, Three Streams Farm, Oaks, Oklahoma
Stacy Brenner, Broadturn Farm, Scarborough

Increasingly, farmers are recognizing that technical skill and business savvy are necessary but not sufficient to run a successful, sustainable family farm. Without the tools to support a healthy work-life balance, farms and/or families struggle to thrive in the long term. Our farms are part of a deeply layered web of human relationships that connect our community, customers, staff, family and all aspects of ourselves to a particular piece of land and a vision for professional and personal fulfillment. Constructively managing these relationships and consciously attending to “work-life balance” are important to ensure that farming and family can coexist and thrive. Guided by the varied experiences, perspectives and practices of three farm families, this session aims to honestly and thoughtfully address the human realities of balancing family and farming. We’ll discuss strategies for fostering healthy, resilient relationships; setting and maintaining boundaries; managing change; being flexible and practicing clear communication.

Z. Pre-cooling and Curing
Chris Callahan, University of Vermont Cooperative Extension
Brittany Hopkins, Wise Acres Farm, Kenduskeag

Properly preparing, cooling, drying or curing, and storing crops can have a big effect on the longevity and quality of the produce heading to market.  Agricultural engineer Chris Callahan will discuss preparation for storage, distribution and market including removing field heat with precooling, washing and packing, sorting and culling, drying or curing, and storage at optimal temperature and relative humidity. Chris has a wealth of knowledge and experience in crop storage requirements and tools used in the business. Brittany Hopkins of Wise Acres Farm will share her experience with a new wash/pack area and adjustments she's made for efficiency and food safety.

A1. Organic Strawberries***
Sonia Schloemann, UMass Cooperative Extension
Ben Marcus, Sheepscot General, Whitefield

Are you being bugged by the tarnished plant bug? Are the weeds taking over before you have a chance to renovate? Hear from Sonia Schloemann and Ben Marcus about how to master your organic strawberry production. *** 3 pesticide applicator credits

B1. Organic Alliums***
Peter Curra, Curra Family Farm, Knox
Molly Crouse and Everett Ottinger, Nettie Fox Farm, Newburgh

Onions, shallots and leeks, oh my! Hear from allium masters Peter Curra, Molly Crouse and Everett Ottinger about their methods for starting, transplanting, tending, harvesting and storing a multitude of allium crops. *** 3 pesticide applicator credits

C1. Pest and Disease Management in Winter Tunnels*
Ann Hazelrigg, University of Vermont
Clay Kirby, UMaine Cooperative Extension
Winter production has become a mainstay of making a farm whole and is a great way to incorporate a rotation crop in a high tunnel. Winter crops seem so easy and free of problems – until the pathogens and pests eventually find your crop. Ann Hazelrigg, who directs the diagnostic laboratory at the University of Vermont, will discuss what diseases she is seeing, how they succeed and how you can succeed at managing them. Clay Kirby will highlight principles of Integrated Pest Management in high tunnels, including pest recognition, monitoring, thresholds, management strategies and evaluation of efforts. * 1 pesticide applicator credit

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Conference fees:

$50 per session; $150 for all four sessions
(the Monday a.m. session includes the keynote)

$75 for all meals; $12 per breakfast; $18 per lunch; $25 for the dinner.

$50 for childcare all sessions; $15 per session.
Child full meal plan $25, $5 per breakfast and lunch; $10 for the dinner.

Discounts for MOFGA members, certified growers, and apprentices and students.

All meals include gluten free and vegan options.

Click here to register


If you would like to support this conference as a sponsor please contact Anna Mueller at
events@mofga.org. We appreciate your generosity in helping us offer this educational event!

If you would like to be an exhibitor at our Trades Show, contact Anna Mueller at events@mofga.org.

 
Accommodations & Venue
 
Point Lookout
Northport, Maine

www.visitpointlookout.com
207-789-2000 or 800-515-3611

Check In begins at 6:30 pm
at the Welcome Center on opening day
(see map of the North Point grounds)

We're excited to once again host the conference at a venue located in the heart of Mid-Coast Maine (MAP).

Point Lookout features tremendous views, hiking trails, bowling alley and pleasant guest accommodations.

Point Lookout Interior
 

Each of Point Lookout's spacious, all-pine cabins (one, two, or three bedroom) feature:

* kitchen with refrigerator and coffeemaker
* queen and king-size beds
* wireless internet access
* central heat and propane fireplaces
* stand-up shower in each of the one or two bathrooms

Cabin reservations will be handled directly through the conference center. We've arranged special room rates ($80 per person in shared 2- or 3-bedroom cabins to $110 for a one bedroom cabin) for conference participants.

Please call Point Lookout at 800-515-3611 to book your room.

• Be sure to call by October 16th and mention the MOFGA Farmer to Farmer Conference.

• If you would like to share a cabin and if you know the party you want to share with, please indicate this.

• If you want to share a cabin but have not found a cabinmate yet, check our Googledoc page to see who else is looking.

Scholarships

Priority will be given to recent participants in the MOFGA Apprenticeship Program, but other new and limited resource farmers are encouraged to apply.

Please note that scholarships do not cover the Friday bus tour or accommodations.

Please visit
this link for details on booking a room at the venue and finding a roomate.


Scholarship application deadline is October 1st.

To apply:
Fill out the scholarship application and indicate level of support requested. Your request will be processed and you will receive an email notifying you of your award and the discount code to use to register. Please do not register online until you've received notification of your award.

We will contact you by October 10th to notify you of the award amount and registration fees owed.

Questions or concerns? please contact:
Anna, Educational Events Coordinator

 


    

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